Diapering Dilema

January 7th, 2012 by

    Happy New Year!  I brought in 2012 by washing diapers.  Yep, that’s right; I am a momma that currently uses cloth diapers.  I haven’t always used them, and I might not use them again in the future, but right now I wash diapers.  While I was waiting for the second rinse cycle to finish, I thought it might be nice to blog on the subject for those of you who are wondering about the health benefits of using cloth.

     My first experience with cloth diapers was when my youngest sister was a baby.  We would fold these “see-through” squares of flannel into a diaper, use pins, rubber pants, a stinky diaper pail, and rinse soiled diapers in the toilet.  Gross!  I vowed that I would never use cloth.  THEN, I had babies…with sensitive skin.  I started with unscented disposables.  I bought them by the truck-load at a membership club.  They worked great…for my first two kids.  Now, even though I am into most things natural, all things healthy, and want to preserve the earth for future generations, I can’t say that I am an “uber-green” momma.  I value my convenience, time, and sanity more than my carbon footprint.  (Sorry to burst your bubble.)  So, I enjoyed buying cheap, disposable diapers that worked for my babies. 

     THEN, I had a baby with SUPER-sensitive skin.  The chlorine in the brand name unscented disposables gave her a horrible rash.  I tried everything, and finally gave up and switched to Seventh Generation diapers.  No chlorine, no rash.  BUT, also no super-savings at a membership club.  Yep, I am a fan of Seventh Generation disposable diapers.  I am not a fan, however, of the price I have to pay for them.  My need to save some money sent me on the hunt towards “alternative” methods of baby waste management. 

     My first project was on EC (Elimination Communication).  This method stresses the importance of parents noticing their child’s habits and signals so that they can take their infant to the toilet before the baby feels the need to use a diaper.  It seems very effective and definitely would save money on diapers.  Problem???  I value my time and sanity too much (see above paragraph) to pay that much attention to my child.  (Well, now you know I’m not Super Woman!)

     So, I begrudgingly began to research cloth diapers.  I found that cloth diapering has evolved quite nicely in the last 20 years!  No more thin flannel squares and squeaky plastic pants–woohoo!!  Now, you can choose between cotton, sherpa, flannel, wool, fitted, all-in-ones, inserts, diaper service, etc.  In fact, there were so many choices that I was overwhelmed!  Fortunately for me, I found a WAHM (Work at Home Mom) that specializes in making cloth diapers.  Her name is Amanda, and she owns a business called Baby Go Green.  She helped me make a decision on cloth diapers after visiting with me about my needs and my lifestyle.  I use organic, cotton, sherpa, one-size fitted diapers and wool diaper covers.  I don’t rinse diapers in the toilet, and I don’t use a nasty, stinky diaper pail.  I still use Seventh Generation disposables for night, traveling, and when Daddy babysits (he’s not as excited about cloth diapers as I am…he,he), but I have a baby with a happy bottom and I still have coins in my piggy bank!

     So, if you are interested in the option of diapering with cloth, whether for saving money, saving skin, or saving the environment, check out Baby Go Green on Facebook!  Also, I found a really great formula for diaper rash that is safe for cloth diapering.  It’s called SC Cleanser from Systemic Formulas. 

     So, here’s to a New Year!  A year of healthy babies and healthy families!!

     Summer Joy

     P.S.  Both SC Cleanser and Seventh Generation disposables are available through Natural Alternatives.

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